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Mythographers we Love: Fates and Furies by Christine Lucas

Genre legends Gwyneth Jones and Melissa Scott were ecstatic over Fates and Furies.

Visions of the fate of our flesh, set in the far future and in our own bitter times, all informed by ancient Hellas: I think I liked the alien migrants in modern Greece best, but I loved all these stories. A very fine cover too!

Gwyneth Jones

This is an extraordinary collection. Myths old and new sing to readers, drawing them ever deeper into a world deeply informed by the Hellenic world. My only regret is that I would gladly have read more of every one of them.

Melissa Scott

Fates and Furies is available on Amazon and on the Candemark and Gleam website, where a purchase brings along the full digital bundle (PDF, Epub and Mobi, with the PDF containing the usual bells and whistles) . All C&G ebooks are DRM-free. The stunning mosaic that graces the collection’s cover, embedded in the deep sea-blue background created by Alan Caum, perfectly distills the collection’s essence in both appearance and backstory.

Christine Lucas lives in Greece with her husband and a horde of spoiled animals. A retired Air Force officer and mostly self-taught in English, she has had her work appear in many SFF magazines, including Daily Science FictionPseudopod, and Nature: Futures. Her stories appear in highly-claimed anthologies; among them Ellen Datlow’s Tails of Wonder and Imagination (“Dominion”, Night Shade, 2010), and Athena Andreadis’ The Other Half of the Sky (“Ouroboros”, Candlemark & Gleam, 2013). She was a finalist for the 2017 WSFA award; her story “Χίλια Μύρια Κύματα” (“A Thousand Waves from Home”, included for the first time in English in Fates and Furies, translated by Christine herself) won the 2017 Φανταστιcon Award; and she’s working on her first novel. You can visit her at Of (Wo)man and Mau.

Get it on Amazon COM

Get it on Amazon UK

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Mythographers we Love: Sons of Chaos (1821)

Oversized, panoramic hardback graphic novel Sons of Chaos, exposes the quiet agenda of Ali Pasha, the Ottoman Empire’s most brutal dictator, and how his fascination with a young Greek boy led to the rise of one of Greece’s most revered heroes— and a war that would define the Western World.

An immersion into the moments we never see, and the self-serving motivations that convince a nation that violence is warranted, and that war is necessary.

In honor of the 200 Year anniversary of the Greek War for Independence, Sons of Chaos presents the story of 1821 through the eyes of Marcos Botsaris, the son of a respected Greek leader taken prisoner as a child and raised within the dungeons of history’s most infamous Ottoman Pasha, known as the “Napoleon of the East”— Ali Pasha of Ioannina. Over the next ten years, the bond formed between them would define history.

The Greek War for Independence was a conflict that quietly influenced the entire world and participants ranged from the London Stock Exchange to celebrities such as Lord Byron, as well as average impassioned Americans willing to transport themselves across the Atlantic to fight alongside the Greeks.

This conflict was the pinnacle of what we now know as the Romantic Period and yet, it’s a war that few know ever existed outside of the Greek and Turkish cultures; a war that stimulated the fall of the Ottoman Empire and shaped Western Civilization as we now know it, and in a sense is being fought today under a different heading amongst today’s political world leaders.

Hundreds of years of Ottoman rule gave the Greeks a reason to fight. Marcos Botsaris gave them a leader.

Buy the book from the official site of Sons of Chaos.

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Mythographers we Love: Becoming Hero

Comic book character kills his author–and in the version with comics, you’re part of it. Either watch as Skye jumps in and out of the comic pages into the novel, or read the grittier, darker, text-only version (first ten chapters of that available free here)!

Skye’s a comic book superhero with a gun in his hand and a gripe against his author. Every girl Skye’s ever dated is either dead or trying to take over the world, and in the series finale, Skye’s best friend kills him. Or so he thinks. The weapon meant to disintegrate Skye lands him in his author’s universe. With a shot at revenge.

Skye, meet Jace. Jacen Howard’s a brilliant #blerd math whiz and comics aficionado–but at his West Baltimore high school that’s a bad thing, and if the bullying isn’t bad enough, Jace’s cop-father regularly pisses off the neighbors. Jace doesn’t see himself as a hero; he’s just trying to survive.

Jace might be just the hero Skye needs.

But Skye won’t open up when Jace tries to ease him out of PTSD, and the author’s still torturing his friends. As Skye’s mood swings and nightmares escalate, Jace realizes that if he doesn’t uncover his roommate’s real identity soon, Skye will hurt someone–and Skye’s still deciding if murder will save his world, or damn his soul.

Read it on Amazon COM

Read it on Amazon UK

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Mythographers we Love: Stargate Command

In case you live under a rock, Stargate is a massive franchise that has heavily influenced quite a lot of media. It has also influenced a lot of our stories.

Stargate is resurrected after a few years of inactivity through an all-inclusive portal called Stargate Command. To kick things into gear they offer a brand new web-series called Stargate Origins, which is a prequel and an origin story of the discovery of the Stargate on Earth.

The show is well-made but low budget for now, with short episodes. You can watch 1-3 for free and sign up with a one-time fee for full access to everything, including all the movies and all the series before that.

By purchasing the All-Access Pass, fans will have access to exclusive content, including full episodes of the new STARGATE series, Stargate Origins, and fans will also have access to a library of STARGATE TV shows and movies, including SG-1, Atlantis, Universe, and all three movies, Stargate (1994), Stargate: The Ark of Truth (2008) and Stargate: Continuum (2008). All-Access Pass holders will be the first to view each episode of the new digital series Stargate Origins episodes.

Fans in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, Australia and New Zealand are able to purchase the All-Access Pass

You can use Opera VPN app to bypass the country limitations, though you should expect it to affect streaming.

The All Access costs just $20. That fact alone makes us really appreciate this modern move. Instead of going for a subscription model, this all-you-can-binge website has it all, trivia, interviews, forums, video that complete the Stargate mythos and promises more to come. Unfortunately, this access seems to be finite:

All-Access starts on September 20, 2017 and ends on May 15, 2018. After May 15, 2018, the All-Access content will no longer be available through your All-Access Pass, but you will still be a member of the Stargate Command community, which will continue.

Read the FAQ

So, it seems they’ll shift to a subscription model or something similar in the future, and just want to get a rush of fans to the site with this offer. We’ll see.

We love Stargate because it fits with our storytelling: Alien beings with wondrous technology that are consumed by their god complex.

Don’t worry, we won’t suddenly turn it all into an Ancient Aliens in Greek Togas theme. But Stargate has influenced a lot of our tales.

  • Technology that has created mythological details. Like the sarcophagus that restores human bodies indefinitely, or the teleporters that seem to be a beam of light from the heavens.
  • Clever people solving problems in bizarre situations.
  • Women that are both feminine and witty, saving their friends as much as they end up saving them back.
  • Beings so consumed by megalomania that they think themselves as gods.
  • Followers blinded by the aforementioned gods’ powers that fanatically preach their teachings and kill in their name.

The series has become convoluted and messy, as all long-running sci-fi seems to have. Thankfully, io9 has compiled a guide that will get you up to speed or simply remind you of the important bits.

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Mythographers we Love: Ancient Blogger

One of the blogs that have popped up recently is that of the Ancient Blogger, a bloke from UK that writes about Greek and Roman mythology. He doesn’t just write, it seems there’s a wealth of pictures and videos and he shows us everything with a touch of humour.

This is him telling us about the aspis, a hoplite shield. Don’t know what that is? Well, click the video then, duh.

And since at the time of posting this, Valentine’s Day is dangerously imminent, I’d like to point you to a specific blog post about Unrequited Love in Ancient Greece.

It all starts with, and on, the island of Lefkada which sits in the Ionian Sea (west of mainland Greece). It’s here where you’ll find a particularly vertigo-inducing white rock which gave the island its old name, Leucas. Apollo had a temple here and if you know your Greek love gossip then you know Apollo is never far from a tragic date.

Lefkada (Leucas) in red

When Aphrodite was grieving for Adonis it was suggested to her by Apollo that she jump off the white rock to cure her feelings. Whether this was sage advice or the sort of thing which siblings do to each other is unclear but as Aphrodite emerged from the sea she was indeed cured.

The famous Sappho apparently jumped from here to cure herself of love, but died, which isn’t exactly surprising. Strabo contends that the first mortal to attempt the feat wasn’t Sappho (as is sometimes stated) but Cephalus who had fallen for Pteralas (10.2.9). Whether Cephalus survived isn’t known but we do have a list of those who attempted and (mostly) failed thanks to a Greek grammarian called Conon who lived around the time of Augustus.

Keep on reading.

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Mythographers we Love: Netflix

Netflix’s marketing has been a blast. From Bright’s Orc auditions, to blending reality with Black Mirror episodes, to the upcoming Altered Carbon series with a real booth at CES promoting the fictional company’s services, they’re spinning their stories and firmly lodging them into everyone’s minds.

Netflix is doing exactly what we predict future corporations will do, meaning blend their own narrative into the real world and in the end it will become indistinguishable from reality. Of course, these are all PR stunts and viral tricks for now, but it won’t be long before these are used as real-world propaganda by more nefarious corps.

Happy New Year with Black Mirror

Orcs auditioning for Bright sequel

Psychasec Booth at CES

Image credit: Mat Smith at Engadget

Read the article.

When they ventured inside, an army of slightly too pretty attendants, dressed-in-white offered vague sci-fi responses to questions (“It’s about transferring your conscious to a new, better body”), while screens all around scrolled through the benefits of replacing your body for a new (sexy, stronger, smarter) model. The aforementioned staff clutched tablets to take email addresses with promises of more information come February 2nd. Plenty took the bait, genuinely curious of where this company was based and whether this was all even possible.

The twist, if you can call it that, happens once you turn a corner, and you’re confronted with a vacuum-sealed human. This is another mannequin, although with some carefully-placed condensation inside the bag, made it rather unsettling. Naturally, I had to poke the “person” in a bag. Morbid fascination.

Needless to say that, at this point we frickin’ love Netflix.

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Mythographers we Love: Greek Myth Comix

This is one of the educational ones. Greek Myth Comix has Greek mythology in stick-figure format, probably influenced by XKCD.

These can be used to teach kids of all ages about certain mythological figures or ancient Greek concepts, like Kudos or the Homeric Hero.

I especially like the Moirai and the Muses poster, I printed these out and have them on my board for reference.

Make sure you visit their store for neat merchandise or large posters.

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Mythographers we Love: String Demons

What if Lady Gaga attended a Greek country fair? What if a Greek folk song steps into the realm of heavy metal?

You’d get String Demons, and their new album Rise of Strings.

Konstantinos and Lydia Boudounis are doing their own thing and remixing from all over the soundscape.

You can get their album from all major services, iTunes, Apple Music, Spotify, Google Play, Deezer, Tidal:

Get the Rise of Strings Album

I especially like their “Pirates” music piece. It’s not on the album but you can listen to it on Youtube:

String Demons Website

 

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Mythographers We Love: Eros and Psyche Project

There’s a very nice comic retelling of the Eros and Psyche myth, by two Greek girls, Myrto Gkiouli and Eirini Skoura.

It was a kickstarted project that got a lot of attention from fans. And it was well deserved, the design is lovely and very emotive.

Get Eros and Psyche in EnglishGet Eros and Psyche in Greek

You can find them on their page on Facebook, for orders etc.

Here’s a juicy taste of the story:

“A light breeze blew in from the window and put out the lamp’s flame, plunging the room in darkness. Using her surprise to his advantage, Eros seized the opportunity and slipped into bed next to her. Her eyes widened in shock; someone was in her bed. That was it, then; time to meet her mysterious husband. She was petrified; from fear or anticipation, she didn’t know.”

Some of the concept art and other mythographies

There’s a limited time promotion running for each ebook order with an added collection of short stories.

Here it is in their own words:

It’s been 2 years since the launch of our campaign, so, in order to celebrate the occasion, starting today, and for the following month, anyone who buys the e-book (at a special price too!), will be getting a bonus pdf with a collection of short stories/outtakes revolving around the myth! (make sure you read the introduction of that thing as well, it’s fun!)

Get Eros and Psyche in EnglishGet Eros and Psyche in Greek

 

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Stop the Presses! Scrooge is Available on Paperback!

No, wait. Start the presses. Start them. Bad analogy.

Scrooge Is Looking For A Taxi

The retelling of “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens is now on paperback.

Scrooge is looking for a taxi to get home on Christmas Eve. But he will get the ride of his life, as he is walked through his past, his present and his future to end up a changed man.

Set in modern day Athens, this science-fiction version of the classic ghost story is guaranteed to bring shivers down your spine and a smile to your face.

“It isn’t too late for all us Scrooges, and this story did make me see more than the classic.”

“An entertaining, uplifting novella perfect to read during Christmastime.”

“This is a rollicking, hiccup producing, laugh out loud morality play that would make Dickens sit up and take notice. A lot of fun!”

Look at these gorgeous Victorian illustrations by Arthur Rackham, the book illustrator of Ebenezer Scrooge’s story. A fine Mythographer indeed. His gritty, realistic drawings inspired the director Guillermo del Toro, who cites Rackham as an influence on the design of “The Faun” of Pan’s Labyrinth.

Sounds fun. Can I get it in time for cozy reading with twinkly ambiance?

Get the paperback book just in time for Christmas:

Amazon says it’ll be there on time. Trust the AI. The AI never lies.

It’s available on Amazon and other regional stores.

Buy on Amazon.comBuy on Amazon.co.uk

Can it get it right now?

If you want the digital version find a store that suits you. Or enjoy the complete experience. Get the acted out audiobook version with the actor Steve White that does the voices and everything!